Now that you have watched the video, created the matrix, and chosen the intervention strategies it is time to put it all together and write the report. • Writing the report • You will write a

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Now that you have watched the video, created the matrix, and chosen the intervention strategies it is time to put it all together and write the report.

• Writing the report

•         You will write a 3-5 page report about your virtual inclusion learning experience.

•         Guidelines to follow:

·         Word document

·         12 inch times new roman font

·         double spaced

·         1 inch margins

• There are 4 sections. Write the title of each section (just as you see them below – ex. Development, Effective Feedback etc.) and underline them on your report.

• Section 1: Development (this section should have four paragraphs)

  • Paragraph 1

• Discuss Sam’s fine motor development – strengths, challenges (was he engaged, peer interactions)

  • Paragraph 2

• Discuss Sam’s gross motor development – strengths, challenges (was he engaged, peer interactions)

  • Paragraph 3

• Discuss Sam’s cognitive development – strengths, challenges (was he engaged, was the activity too easy/challenging)

  • Paragraph 4

• Discuss Sam’s language/communication development –strengths, challenges (did he use verbal language, receptive                      language)

  • Paragraph 5

• Discuss Sam’s social-emotional development – strengths, challenges (was he able to initiate interactions, could he                          continue back and forth interactions, did he understand the play sequence)

• Section 2: Effective Feedback (2 paragraphs)

• Provide overall suggestions/feedback to the teachers working with Sam.  Develop a script on what you would say to the teachers to help Sam become more engaged and move up the developmental ladder.

• Paragraph 1

• Start with a couple of things the teachers did well (Ex. “I really liked how you…” “Sam seemed to enjoy when you…”)

• Paragraph 2

• Then provide a few suggestions (Ex. “When you are playing with Sam…” “A way to increase his communication                                 development is…”)

• Section 3: Activity Matrix

• Create a table as seen on slide 3 – your table should be embedded in your report and look EXACTLY as it is formatted on             slide 3

• In Microsoft word, click on insert in the tool bar and then table.

• The matrix must be in this section and not at the end of the  paper.

• Section 4: Intervention Strategies (3 paragraphs)

• Paragraph 1: Strategy 1

• Start by telling me what strategy you chose.  Explain the strategy and how you would attempt to implement it with Sam.                 Give one pretend scenario of you and Sam (you can include peers, materials/toys, and any environment) in your pretend                 scenario.

• Paragraph 2: Strategy 2

• Start by telling me what strategy you chose.  Explain the strategy and how you would attempt to implement it with Sam.                 Give one pretend scenario of you and Sam (you can include peers, materials/toys, and any environment) in your pretend                 scenario.

• Paragraph 3: Strategy 3

• Start by telling me what strategy you chose.  Explain the strategy and how you would attempt to implement it with Sam.                 Give one pretend scenario of you and Sam (you can include peers, materials/toys, and any environment) in your pretend                 scenario.

• Turning in your Virtual Inclusion Learning Experience

• You will upload your typed word document. Double check that you have followed all the guidelines from Step 4. Then go back and read your report once again to proof read for spelling, grammar, and mechanical errors. The due date is: Friday, October 30, 2020.

Now that you have watched the video, created the matrix, and chosen the intervention strategies it is time to put it all together and write the report. • Writing the report • You will write a
VIRTUAL INCLUSION LEARNING EXPERIENCE CD 477 NICOLE BRICENO, MS STEP 1: VIEW VIDEO ON CANVAS • View video on canvas. • Sam is a 4 year old boy with a developmental delay. • Take notes about what you obser ve. • Note strengths and challenges • Peer interactions • Teacher engagement • Pay attention to his development in each domain • You will likely need to view the video a few times to complete the assignment STEP 2: CREATING A MATRIX • Develop an activity matrix for the target child. Refer to page 44 -48 in your textbook as a guide. You will create a matrix for Sam. The “difficulties child is having” should be based on your video obser vations. You will not actually complete this matrix so feel free to dream big! Your matrix should look like the example in the box to the right. Difficulties child is having: Changes to environment or processes: Goals: J plays by himself during center time. When other children approach him, he does not appear to notice them and does not make eye contact. When the center becomes loud, he moves to another area of the room and can become overstimulated and begin pacing. 1. Add a safe place for J that he can be taught to go to self – regulate. 2. Assist J in playing with others by embedding learning opportunities using his favorite toys. 3. Play “take away” and other fun games with high affect to increase his eye contact. The goal of these changes are to give J a safe place for him to self -regulate when he becomes overwhelmed in the classroom, promote interactions with peers in an intentional way, and increase eye contact. STEP 3: CHOOSE INTERVENTION STRATEGIES • Write down THREE strategies/intervention goals that you would try if you were in Sam’s classroom. Consider your observation when choosing the strategy or intervention goal that you think might work best. The ten options to choose from are : 1. Embedded learning opportunities 2. Praise 3. Promoting generalization 4. Responsive interaction strategies 5. Environmental arrangement strategies 6. Modeling 7. Simplifying the activity 8. Peer support 9. Following the child’s lead 10. Develop imaginative play • The next few slides describe the 10 options. You can also find more information in your textbook or complete outside research. • You should not decide I want to utilize a different strategy than the 10 discussed. You must use three of the approved strategies on this slide. 1. EMBEDDED LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES • Provide instruction during naturally occurring routines and activities in an intentional way. • The intervention should work on increasing engagement and participation and targeting behaviors that help the child learn to be independent and develop social relationships. • Example: So if a child with delayed fine motor skills has a goal to increase hand strength, these opportunities would natural ly occur when the child uses various scoops in the sensor y table, molds playdough in the art center, and pours from a pitcher during meal t ime s. 2. PRAISE • Ultimately, we want children to be intrinsically motivated. Children who are intrinsically motivated are less impulsive and display less behavior challenges because they are naturally reinforced. • We want to avoid motivating children with external rewards such as food, excessive praise, money, and toys as these children can begin to an expect a reward to complete an activity. • In between, there is descriptive praise which encourages children rather than judges children. You want to avoid “good job” and describe what the child is doing and provide encouraging commentar y. 3. PROMOTING GENERALIZATION • When a skill “is taught under one set of conditions and the child is able to apply the same skill with different people, in a new place, and using other materials.” • It could be an interaction. For example, the teacher models for a child how to approach a peer and say “ Can I play blocks with you?” while gently touching his shoulder. Generalization would occur when you notice the child, approaching a peer on the playground saying “Can I slide with you?” or in the reading area saying “Can I sit with you?” The teacher could then say the child knows how to approach peer and request to join in play. • Example. In the photo there are three fish. If a child can only recognize one photo as a fish than he/she has not generalized when a fish looks like. Generalization occurs naturally for most children but for children with special needs, it is often a skill that needs to be promoted. 4. RESPONSIVE INTERACTION STRATEGIES • The broad goal of responsive interaction strategies is to establish an interactive context. This is accomplished by responding to the child’s verbal and non -verbal initiations. The focus is on taking turns, sustained interactions, comprehension of spoken language, and spontaneous interaction that the child enjoys. • Focus on: 1. Following the child’s attention 2. Taking turns in interactions 3. Maintaining the child’s topic 4. Talking about what the child is doing and what they are doing together 5. Matching the level of complexity of the child’s language 6. Expanding and repeating the child’s utterances • So if the child wanders to the block area and begins stacking blocks, the adult would join the child in stacking blocks, focusing on taking turns, staying jointly engaged, and enhancing language. 1. So in this case, the child is interested in stacking blocks so the teacher or parent would join the child in stacking blocks. She would not suggest a puzzle. 2. The adult would stack a block and then the child would stack a block. 3. The adult would help the child stay focused on the task. So if he gets up from the table, she would say “uh oh, we have more blocks.” 4. The adult would say “You have the red one and I have the blue one. I will put mine on top.” 5. The adult uses simple language such as “uh oh” “block” “up, up, up” 6. At the same time, they are expanding and repeating the child’s utterance. If the child says “block,” the adult would say “red block” 5. ENVIRONMENTAL ARRANGEMENT STRATEGIES • Nonverbal schemes for eliciting communication. This is not something the teacher says but rather how he/she sets up the environment to elicit communication. • Six environmental arrangement strategies: 1. Provide interesting materials and activities 2. Place desired materials in sight but out of reach 3. Offer small portions of needed or desired materials 4. Provide many choice -making opportunities 5. Set up situations in which children need assistance 6. Create unexpected situations • In this picture, the child with limited mobility is putting together a small knobbed puzzle. The teacher is next to her for support. 1. In this example, the parent knows the child enjoys brightly colored puzzles. If she set up a box of legos the child may not seem as interested in the activity. 2. pieces for the puzzle are placed above the puzzle and out of reach of the child. So the child will either have to ask for help or make eye contact and gesture for another piece. This will elicit communication. 3. So once the child communicate she needs another piece, the adult would only want to give the child one piece. Why? Because then she will be required to communicate again! 4. Would you like the piece with the cat or the piece with the dog? 5. In this example, the child may need help getting a piece in and instead offering assistance, encourage the child to communicate that she needs help. 6. adult could hide one piece behind her and say “uh oh, where did the cow piece go?” “can you help me find it?” “where could it be?” to elicit communication with the child. 6. MODELING Modeling is simply showing a child how to do something or say something by providing a demonstration in order to elicit a verbal or motor imitation. • Six steps to modeling: 1. Note the child’s interest 2. Establish joint attention 3. Present a verbal model that labels the child’s interest 4. When the child imitates the model, acknowledge, and expand 5. If child does not imitate the model, present a corrective model 6. If child does not respond of responds incorrectly to the corrective model, provide feedback but allow the child access to item 1. In this example, the boy is interested in painting because the teacher notices him gazing at the art table with paint set our. 2. The teacher sits beside the boy and focuses her attention on the paint too 3. The teacher says “paint” 4. If the boy then says paint the teacher would say, “yes, you want to paint!” 5. If the boy does not say paint or makes an unintelligible sound, the teacher would model a second time… “paint” 6. When you want to paint, say “paint.” Here is the paint. I can’t wait to see what you are going to create. 7. SIMPLIFY THE ACTIVITY • Break a task into smaller steps or change or reduce the number of steps the child does on her own. • For a child who is interested in an activity but is overwhelmed by the steps, add photos of the process (ex. ). • Simplify the activity by changing a step such as having precut shapes or having glue sticks and glue bottles. 8. PEER SUPPORT • Use a child’s peers as models or to support the child during activities only when he needs it. • Partnering a child with a delay or disability with a same -age peer will allow an opportunity for the children to take turns on what might be a difficult activity otherwise. 9. FOLLOW THE CHILD’S LEAD • What the child is interested in is the window to what is meaningful and pleasurable to her. It could be stacking blocks, staring at a fan, putting a puzzle together, dumping and filling a bucket, lining up small cars, and the list goes on. What is naturally interesting to this child? What is something you are interested in? If I wanted to interact with you and form a relationship with you, I would have a better chance of reaching you through that activity. When teachers pay attention to what the child is already interested in, and help the child expand, children are more likely to persist in working towards developmental goals. • The reason we follow a child’s lead is to join their world, harness motivation, and help the child feel more in control. 10. DEVELOP IMAGINATIVE PLAY • Pretending helps build a symbolic world by increasing the child’s ability to use words and ideas. To encourage pretending, add make – believe elements to the child’s favorite activities. If Shyanne likes to play with a wooden spoon and bowl in the kitchen, encourage even more imagination by pretending she is a chef. Carlos enjoys pushing large trucks. Grab a doll and put it in his truck. Speak for the doll not yourself. This introduces Carlos to new ideas and symbolic constructs. Say “can I ride in your car? If you don’t say no, I’m going to get into your car.” Keep extending everyday! Add picture cues for visual learners. STEP 4: PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER Now that you have watched the video, created the matrix, and chosen the intervention strategies it is time to put it all together and write the report. • Writing the report • You will write a 3 -5 page report about your virtual inclusion learning experience. • Guidelines to follow: • Word document • 12 inch times new roman font • double spaced • 1 inch margins • There are 4 sections. Write the title of each section ( just as you see them below –ex. Development, Effective Feedback etc.) and underline them on your report. • Section 1: Development (this section should have four paragraphs) • Paragraph 1 • Discuss Sam’s fine motor development –strengths, challenges (was he engaged, peer interactions) • Paragraph 2 • Discuss Sam’s gross motor development –strengths, challenges (was he engaged, peer interactions) • Paragraph 3 • Discuss Sam’s cognitive development –strengths, challenges (was he engaged, was the activity too easy/challenging) • Paragraph 4 • Discuss Sam’s language/communication development – strengths, challenges (did he use verbal language, receptive language) • Paragraph 5 • Discuss Sam’s social -emotional development –strengths, challenges (was he able to initiate interactions, could he continue back and forth interactions, did he understand the play sequence) STEP 4 CONTINUED • Section 2: Effective Feedback (2 paragraphs) • Provide overall suggestions/feedback to the teachers working with Sam. Develop a script on what you would say to the teachers to help Sam become more engaged and move up the developmental ladder. • Paragraph 1 • Start with a couple of things the teachers did well (Ex. “I really liked how you…” “Sam seemed to enjoy when you…”) • Paragraph 2 • Then provide a few suggestions (Ex. “When you are playing with Sam…” “A way to increase his communication development is…”) • Section 3: Activity Matrix • Create a table as seen on slide 3 – your table should be embedded in your report and look EXACTLY as it is formatted on slide 3 • In Microsoft word, click on insert in the tool bar and then table. • The matrix must be in this section and not at the end of the paper. STEP 4 CONTINUED • Section 4: Intervention Strategies (3 paragraphs) • Paragraph 1: Strategy 1 • Start by telling me what strategy you chose. Explain the strategy and how you would attempt to implement it with Sam. Give one pretend scenario of you and Sam (you can include peers, materials/toys, and any environment) in your pretend scenario. • Paragraph 2: Strategy 2 • Start by telling me what strategy you chose. Explain the strategy and how you would attempt to implement it with Sam. Give one pretend scenario of you and Sam (you can include peers, materials/toys, and any environment) in your pretend scenario. • Paragraph 3: Strategy 3 • Start by telling me what strategy you chose. Explain the strategy and how you would attempt to implement it with Sam. Give one pretend scenario of you and Sam (you can include peers, materials/toys, and any environment) in your pretend scenario. STEP 5: SUBMITTING TO CANVAS • Turning in your Virtual Inclusion Learning Experience • You will upload your typed word document. Double check that you have followed all the guidelines from Step 4. Then go back and read your report once again to proof read for spelling, grammar, and mechanical errors. The due date is: ________________. VIRTUAL INCLUSION LEARNING EXPERIENCE REPORT RUBRIC Exemplary Developed Competent No Marks Development The student was able to cohesively yet descriptively describe the child’s development in all areas (fine motor, gross motor, cognition, communication, and social -emotional); strengths and challenges are identified; virtually free from mechanical errors; guidelines followed; student only provides factual information (16 points) One of the criteria from the exemplary column is not evidenced. (11 points ) Two of the criteria from the exemplary column is not evidenced. (5 points) The student did not complete the development section as directed, had significant errors in spelling/grammar, and did not follow guidelines. (0 points) Suggestions The student was able to cohesively yet descriptively identify the strengths and challenges displayed by the teachers and use those to provide suggestions/effective feedback for engagement and development; virtually free from mechanical errors; guidelines followed . (10 points) One of the criteria from the exemplary column is not evidenced. (6 points ) Two of the criteria from the exemplary column is not evidenced. (3 points) The student did not complete the section as directed, had significant errors in spelling/grammar, and did not follow guidelines. (0 points) Matrix The student created a matrix that followed the example provided; the matrix is based on a challenge identified; the changes and goals are reflective of the observations; guidelines followed . (8 points) One of the criteria from the exemplary column is not evidenced. (5 points ) Two of the criteria from the exemplary column is not evidenced. (3 points) The student did not complete the matrix as directed, was not able to create relevant changes and goals, and did not follow guidelines. (0 points) Intervention Strategies The student identified and described three approved strategies; The student developed a scenario using the intervention strategy to show depth of knowledge; virtually free from mechanical errors; guidelines followed. (16 points) One of the criteria from the exemplary column is not evidenced. (11 points ) Two of the criteria from the exemplary column is not evidenced. (5 points) The student did not complete the section as directed, had significant errors in spelling/grammar, and did not follow guidelines. (0 points)
Now that you have watched the video, created the matrix, and chosen the intervention strategies it is time to put it all together and write the report. • Writing the report • You will write a
I don’t know if you are able to see it but let me know if you can. https://smttt-my.sharepoint.com/personal/w324982_usm_edu/_layouts/15/onedrive.aspx?id=%2Fpersonal%2Fw324982%5Fusm%5Fedu%2FDocuments%2Fcd477%2FVirtual%20Inclusion%20Learning%20Experience%20VIDEO%2Ewmv&parent=%2Fpersonal%2Fw324982%5Fusm%5Fedu%2FDocuments%2Fcd477&originalPath=aHR0cHM6Ly9zbXR0dC1teS5zaGFyZXBvaW50LmNvbS86djovZy9wZXJzb25hbC93MzI0OTgyX3VzbV9lZHUvRVUzdVpQYTBiTHRFbUFBUHlGSWExdHNCdHRFeVFQNG1scFgxV2xVZ1dWMXI0dz9ydGltZT0xZlNEblVoNzJFZw
Now that you have watched the video, created the matrix, and chosen the intervention strategies it is time to put it all together and write the report. • Writing the report • You will write a
Autism Spectrum Disorder/ADHD Sam and the rest of the kids are rotating to different learning center. Section I Fine Motor Development It’s a classroom setting with the teacher trying to teach Sam how to properly floss and brush his teeth using the bottom of an egg carton (used for teeth), string (floss), and shaving cream (for toothpaste). Once demonstrated, he is left alone to perform the task by himself. He picks up the can and try to spray more toothpaste on the teeth and has to use both hands to spray it. Section II Fine Motor Development The teacher is trying to get Sam to pull the string through holes around the teeth on the paper. The teacher is assisting and he does it right but once she left the center he quit doing it. Section III Gross Motor Development Sam has to toss the toothbrushes into a pan. He tosses them real hard passing the pan. He started doing it better and landing the toothbrushes in the pan. Section IV Cognitive Development There are 3 pictures of a tooth with the numbers 1, 2, and 3. Teacher ask Sam what number is that and when he says 1, he is supposed to put one bean onto the picture of the tooth. He got the bucket of beans and put a lot of beans on the tooth. He tried putting the bean in his mouth and was redirected. He couldn’t tell the teacher what the number #2 was on the picture of a tooth. Social and Emotional Development Language Development The next station, the teachers dressed Sam up with a mask and scrubs as if he was a dentist. Sam told his patient (another student) he needs to bush, eat good foods. They discuss why the dentist wears a mask.

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