Part One: Cultural Formulation Interview Read “Topic 2: Vargas Case Study.” Select one of the Vargas family members and complete a Cultural Formulation Interview based on the “Cultural Formulation” se

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Part One:


Cultural Formulation Interview

Read “Topic 2: Vargas Case Study.” Select one of the Vargas family members and complete a Cultural Formulation Interview based on the “Cultural Formulation” section in the DSM-5 and based on the new information learned in session two of the Vargas case study. Refer to the attached CFI form for guidance and complete the CFI template.


Part Two: Cultural Diversity Reflection

Write a 200 to 250-word response about how in a counseling session with the Vargas family you can attend to multiculturalism and diversity. Please refer to the cultural diversity section of the counselor dispositional expectationsdocument for guidance.

APA format is not required, but solid academic writingis expected.

This assignment uses a rubric. Please review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion.

Part One: Cultural Formulation Interview Read “Topic 2: Vargas Case Study.” Select one of the Vargas family members and complete a Cultural Formulation Interview based on the “Cultural Formulation” se
CNL-521 Topic 2: Vargas Case Study Elizabeth arrives on time with Frank and Heidi for the second session. Elizabeth appears somewhat frazzled and tells you that she had just heard from Bob who said he would be “a little late” because he “lost track of time.” You note Elizabeth’s frustration which she confirms by saying this is “typical.” She proceeds to share that she feels “completely disregarded,” especially after having shared with Bob the night before how important these sessions are to her. You notice that Heidi seems upset as well and looks as if she has been crying. You ask her how her day is going and she tearfully tells you that Frankie tore up her school paper with the gold star on it. Elizabeth elaborates that Frank had become angry and ripped up the picture that Heidi was proudly sharing with her. Frank, who had gone directly to the Legos, appears oblivious to the others in the room. When you ask him about his sister’s sadness, he replies, “Who cares? She always gets gold stars!” As you were about to further explore these feelings, Bob arrives stating, “She probably told you I’m always late, but hey, at least I’m consistent.” You notice Elizabeth’s eye rolling and direct your attention to the children, asking them about what brought them to your office. Heidi says, “I’m good but Frankie’s bad at school, and it makes Mommy and Daddy fight.” Frank, who had helped himself to one of your books to use as a car ramp argues, “I hate school. It’s boring and my teacher is mean.” Bob attributes Frank’s boredom to being “too smart for the second grade…what do they expect?” Elizabeth responds that they, like her, expect him to follow rules and be respectful, and suggests that Bob should share those same expectations. Bob dismisses Elizabeth’s concerns by saying, “He’s a normal boy, not like all your friends from work who you say are ‘creative.’” You notice Elizabeth’s reaction and decide to redirect your attention to Frank. You ask him what bothers him most about school, to which he replies, “I get in trouble, then I don’t get to have all the recess time, then I can’t play soccer because they already started and they won’t let me play.” You notice Frank’s interest in sports and probe for more information. You learn that he is quite athletic and has been asked to join a competitive youth soccer team that plays on Saturdays and Sundays. You discover another source of discord when Elizabeth shares that Bob “feels strongly” that Sundays are to be spent only at church and with family. Bob confirms that after church on Sundays, they spend the rest of the day with his parents, siblings, nieces, and nephews. Elizabeth says that Sunday mornings are the only time she gets to be by herself and that she typically joins the family around 1:00 p.m. Bob adds, “Apparently Liz needs time to herself more than she needs God and her family,” and suggests she should appreciate his family more because “it’s the only family she has.” As the session comes to a close, you share your observations of the family by noting their common goal of wanting to enjoy family time together. You also suggest that while Frank’s behavior challenges are concerning, perhaps you could focus next week on learning more about each parent’s family of origin in hopes of gaining a better understanding of the couple’s relationship. © 2019. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved.
Part One: Cultural Formulation Interview Read “Topic 2: Vargas Case Study.” Select one of the Vargas family members and complete a Cultural Formulation Interview based on the “Cultural Formulation” se
Counselor Dispositional Expectations Dispositions are the values, commitments, and professional ethics that influence behaviors toward others, and, if sincerely held, dispositions lead to actions and patterns of professional conduct. The Grand Canyon University Counseling Program’s dispositions adhere to the University’s mission statement, as well as to the established counseling profession codes of ethics. The Grand Canyon University Counseling Program have adopted the following dispositions for its students derived from the American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics. Although these dispositions are not all inclusive, they do represent values and qualities that are warranted by counseling students. Students who fail to adhere to or demonstrate such dispositions may be subject to disciplinary actions. Psychological Fitness: Counselors* are aware and assess their motives for pursuing the counseling profession. They are aware of their unfinished emotional and/or mental health issues, and resolve them before starting to provide counseling services to others. Counselors engage in self-care and seek resolutions to issues that arise during their practice. Counselors adhere to the American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics and/or the NAADAC, the Association for Addiction Professionals Code of Ethics. Self-Awareness: Counselors are aware of their personal moral, ethical, and value systems and provide counseling services with objectivity, justice, fidelity, veracity, and benevolence. Counselors are acutely aware of their personal limitations in providing services, and are willing to refer clients to another provider when necessary. Cultural Diversity: Counselors respect, engage, honor, and embrace diversity and a multicultural approach that supports the worth, dignity, potential, and uniqueness of people within their social and cultural context. Counselors promote self-advocacy and assist clients in advocating for empowerment within their cultural context. Acceptance: Counselors foster a healthy climate of change by providing and promoting acceptance, and a nonjudgmental environment during the therapeutic process. They understand their personal value system and do not impose their values, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors on their clients. Empathy: Counselors foster understanding, compassion, and avoid any actions that can cause harm to a client. Counselors treat others with dignity and respect. Genuineness: Counselors deal truthfully with themselves and their clients, in order to avoid harming their clients. Flexibility: Counselors practice a client-centered approach, and align treatment to the client’s goals for therapy. Patience: Counselors understand the therapeutic process and respect client’s efforts to gain control over their lives. Counselors encourage an environment that promotes self-empowerment and allows client’s voice in the therapeutic process. Amiability: Counselors do not support or engage in any act of discrimination against a prospective, current, or former client. Counselors promote and practice social justice and do not exploit others in their professional relationships. Professional Identity: Counselors adhere to regulatory state boards and nationally recognized codes of ethics. Counselors practice only within their scope and competencies. They seek to utilize best practices and empirically supported treatments. Counselors stay current with the counseling profession through seeking continuing education, and by supporting counseling associations. * The term counselor is used to refer to counselors in training at the graduate level. American Counseling Association (2014). ACA Code of Ethics. Alexandria, VA: Author. Walz, G. R., & Bleuer, J. C. (2010). Counselor dispositions: An added dimension for admission decisions. Vistas Online publication, 1, 11-11. © 2019. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved.

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